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Is eLearning for me?

Is eLearning for me?

1. My technology access is best described as:
Having regular (and easy) access to a computer is important because you'll need to log on and do work multiple times each week!
If you don't have your own computer at home you can always use the computers located in the BCC computer labs or the BCC library. But, you'll need to plan accordingly because our campuses aren't open 24/7 and it's important that you submit all of your work on time!
 
2. My technology skills are:
You don't have to be a computer wiz to take online classes, but you should at least be able to:
  1. Navigate a website
  2. Create, save, and locate any documents or files you've created
  3. Upload or attach documents to an email or assignment drop-box
  4. Download and save files that your instructor may provide to you (either online or as email attachments)
  5. Know how to spell check your work before you submit it (note that every place you can post in eLearning has a little ABC button with a checkmark that you can click to check your spelling!)
  6. Log-in and use your Office 365 email account
  7. Feel comfortable troubleshooting if you have a problem! And if you can't figure out why it's not working by yourself, then you should know how to reach out and get help!
3. I think that taking a class online will be easier than a face-to-face class
It is true that the same amount of work is required in online and face-to-face classes but obviously taking the course online means that you'll be interacting differently with your classmates and your instructor. Many students feel that online courses are more work and take more time because they require you to be a self-directed and self-motivated learner.
No! The same amount of work is required in online and face-to-face classes. Although you do not need to physically come to campus, you still need to set-aside equivalent time to learn, study and interact in the online classroom. If you were going to take a 3 credit course you would come to campus for 3 hours a week and would spend an additional 3-6 hours a week doing reading and homework outside of the classroom. In the online environment, you will spend the same amount of time, at least 6 hours a week per class, but you will need to figure out on your own how to structure your learning.
4. I manage my time:
If you feel confident in your time management skills then you'll find that taking online classes are for you! Don't stop there though. Try researching some additional time management skills that you can add to your tool belt!
If you do not have great time management skills, try following these simple steps!
  1. Make a plan and create structure! Create a schedule that fits your routine. Check your syllabus and commit dates on your calendar for studying.
  2. Check into your course daily! You can check in from a computer, phone or tablet. Creating a daily activity of checking your online course. This could include checking for communications, assignments graded, or what's due this week.
  3. Speaking of what's due this week. Check what's happening next week, and the weeks that follow. Knowing what is due is great, however the real power comes from knowing what's coming next. This will aid you in better planning your free time to tackle projects that may take some extra effort than your standard week to week assignments. You know, like that 3-5 pages research paper that your professor mentioned in week 4 but isn't due until week 6 or week 7?!
  4. Communication is key! Speak up when you need to. If you feel that you may be struggling, falling behind, or just not feeling confident regarding some material or instructions, SPEAK UP. Reach out to your instructor. Their there to help. Reach out to college resources such as the library, tutoring, office of disability services, or technology support.
5. I feel comfortable interacting online.
If you feel comfortable interacting online with others through a discussion board, blog, or through audio or video then online classes may be a good fit for you! Most classes require regular contributions to an online discussion board, blog or wiki. Some will ask students to interact "live" using an online chat room or Skype (possibly using video or audio).
Most classes require regular contributions to an online discussion board, blog or wiki. Some will ask students to interact "live" using an online chat room or Skype (possibly using video or audio). Students who are visual or verbal learners may find that online learning fits their learning style while kinesthetic or auditory learners may struggle in the 100% online classroom. Students who have a good understanding of how they learn best will be most successful in the online classroom.